Aquatic Biomes

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Aquatic Biomes 2018-08-05T12:08:45+00:00

Aquatic Biomes

 

plants and animals are adapted for certain amounts of temperature and moisture.  Aquatic biomes can be generally classified based on the amount of salt in the water. Freshwater biomes have less than 1% salt and are typical of ponds and lakes, streams and rivers, and wetlands. Marine biomes have more salt and are characteristic of the oceans, coral reefs, and estuaries.

 

Marine Biomes

Aquatic biomes in the ocean are called marine biomes. Organisms that live in marine biomes must be adapted to the salt in the water.

The oceans are the largest of all the ecosystems. They can be divided into four separate zones based on the amount of sunlight. Ocean zones are also divided based on their depth and their distance from land.

 

Freshwater Biomes

Freshwater biomes are defined by their low salt concentration, usually less than 1%. Plants and animals in freshwater regions are adjusted to the low salt content and would not be able to survive in areas of high salt concentration, such as the ocean. There are different types of freshwater biomes: ponds and lakes , streams and rivers, and wetlands. Ponds and lakes range in size from just a few square meters to thousands of square kilometers.

 

Wetlands are areas of standing water that support aquatic plants. Wetlands include marshes, swamps, and bogs.

 

Aquatic Biomes and Sunlight

In large bodies of water, such as the ocean and lakes, the water can be divided into zones based on the amount of sunlight it receives:

 

*The photic zone extends to a maximum depth of 200 meters (656 feet) below the surface of the water. This is where enough sunlight penetrates for photosynthesis to occur. Algae and other photosynthetic organisms can make food and support food webs.

 

*The aphotic zone is water deeper than 200 meters. This is where too little sunlight penetrates for photosynthesis to occur. As a result, producers must make “food” by chemosynthesis, or the food must drift down from the water above.

 

Summary

Aquatic biomes are distinguished by the availability of sunlight and the concentration of dissolved oxygen and nutrients in the water.

The photic zone extends to a maximum depth of 200 meters, while the aphotic zone is deeper than 200 meters.

Aquatic biomes in the ocean are called marine biomes.

 

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